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20100101
20100131
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
to find out how america got rolled, began hearings this week. these four are not the victims of one of the greatest bank heists in history; they're the perpetrators, bankers so sleek and crafty, they got off with the loot in broad daylight, and then sweet-talked the government into taxing us to pay it back. watching that scene on the opening day of the hearings, it was hard enough to believe that almost a year has passed since barack obama raised his hand, too, taking the oath of office to become our 44th president. even harder to remember what america looked like before obama, because we've also been robbed of memory, assaulted by what the nobel laureate czeslaw milosz described as a "fantastic proliferation of mass media." we live in a time "characterized by a refusal to remember." inconvenient facts simply disappear down the memory hole, as in george orwell's novel, "1984." president obama's made plenty of mistakes during his first year, and we've critiqued them frequently here on the journal, but hardly anyone talks anymore about what happened in the years before obama. he inher
. america's all about free markets. what's wrong with that? that is a basic american value." >> the marketplace of ideas doesn't give any one, any corporation or any individual the constitutional right to buy an election. i mean, the first amendment is an important part of our constitution, but so is the idea that this is a democracy. this is... no matter this is a society based on the idea of one person, one vote. and our elections should not be marketplaces. they should be about voters. they should be about helping the electorate make an informed decision. and the electorate is not going to be able to make an informed decision if all they can see on the air, if all they can, you know, hear on the radio are, you know, attack ads funded by hidden corporate agendas. >> i would say that it's... we're a society of freedom and markets. and political freedom is so important. political freedom means the freedom to speak and say what you as an individual citizen believe, the freedom to vote. and it means having some power in your society. and then we have this extraordinary system
, the pundits said, people have spoken-- 100,000 of them, at least-- and america is red again.ñr listen to the right's partisan boom box: >> republicans are starting to go where no republicans have gone before-- places, strange places, for republicans-- like new jersey, and possibly now massachusetts. >> tonight everything-- yes, everything-- is turned upside down. the political impossible has happened. >> this was a center-right country, even in massachusetts, repudiating a left agenda. this is not rocket science. >> moyers: but let's get another take on the news from two avowed progressives known for their candor and clarity. melissa harris-lacewell is an associate professor of politics and african american studies at princeton university. her commentary and analysis have appeared in publications across the country. she's at work on a new book titled, "sister citizen: a text for colored girls who've considered politics when being strong wasn't enough." eric alterman is distinguished professor of english and journalism at brooklyn college, and a professor of journalism at the city univ
jobs. create jobs rit here in the united states america. >> moyers: that'right, jobs. 29 times he mentionejobs. anwell he might. 43 states last month, the number of peop out of work was higher than a month earlier. this mon, one million people will run out of employment compensation. votersn massachusetts had jobs on their mind, too, and nt washinon a message saying, "pay attention." my next guest s been saying e same thing for months now, and often directly to the president. he thinks the meage finally broke through. richartrumka is the head of the a.of l.-c.i.o., representing 11 million mbers and 57 national an international unions he became its esident less than six months ago, after serving 15 years athe a.f. of l.'s secretaryreasurer. the son and grdson of coal mirs, he made his way through college and law school worki as they did-- blasti, drilling and hauling coal from th dangerous depths of the pennsylvania coal fields. he climbed his way up the nks of the united mineorkers of america at aime when that union was still rocked by violence and corruptio leading a form ticket,
way, this financial lobby has changed america. what do you mean by that? that goes deeper than campaign contributions and money and even influence in washington. you say they've changed our framework. >> yeah, yeah. it goes a lot deeper. it's what simon johnson the chief... former chief economist for the i.m.f., it's what he calls intellectual capture. and... >> moyers: intellectual capture. >> right. it goes beyond regulatory capture, where, say the banks control the s.e.c. that's one thing. intellectual capture means that essentially the financial industry has convinced us, you know, in the '50s what was good for general motors was good for america. now it's what's good for wall street is good for america. and they've somehow convinced us that we shouldn't ask about what's right or what works or what's good for america. we should ask what's productive, what's efficient, what helps grow the economy. >> this is the stockholm syndrome. where you're hostage starts identifying with the people holding them captive. americans have been, you know, have been talk... said, told over an
financial industry has convinced us,ou knowin the '50s what was good for general motors w good for america. now it'shat's good for wall street is od for america. and ey've somehow convinced us that we shouldn't k about what's rightr what works or what's good foamerica. we should ask what productive, what'sfficient, what helps grow the economy. >> this is the stockho syndrome. where you're hostage start identifying with the peoe lding them captive. americans haveeen, you know, have been talk... sa, told overnd over again that if the dow's going up, if wl street's makingoney, it's good for you. >> moyers: often when rkers are being id off. that's... >> yh, but other measurements the economy aren't taken to... aren't held in such hi esteem and so, when i was talki to members of congress and pollers about why there was not moreopular, you know, revulsion ainst wall street that was leading to tion in washingtoncongressman brad sherman-- he's a demrat from california. he led, during the wholearp gument, what he called the skepcs caucus. they were kind of posed, but they were just rsing questions
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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